Tag: Free

CANCELLED-Tomato Taste at Plum Grove

UPDATE: This event has been cancelled because of the coronavirus outbreak. Look back next year for similar events!

The public is invited to sample tomatoes at the annual Tomato Taste at Plum Grove, hosted by the Master Gardeners of Johnson County. The Tomato Taste is a tribute to heritage tomatoes in Iowa’s long history with food.

Several varieties of heritage tomatoes will be sampled.

The historic residence was the home of Robert and Friendly Lucas, built in 1844. Robert served as the first governor of the Territory of Iowa from 1838 until 1841. Iowa was admitted to the Union as a state December 3, 1846.

After years of negotiating with the Johnson County Historical Society that cares for the property, longtime Master Gardener Betty Kelly launched the heritage garden in 1995 as the state planned Iowa’s Sesquicentennial. Kelly, who has researched the family including Friendly’s diaries and letters, and newspapers to identify what people were eating, says every effort is made to be authentic in the garden and for each tasting opportunity.

Master Gardeners plant and maintain several gardens at the historic property. Today, Plum Grove boasts three gardens: Kitchen Garden (1995), Flowers (1998), and a Wildflower Garden (2000).

This event is open to the public. Suggested donation is $3.

 

CANCELLED-Taste of Plum Grove

UPDATE: This event has been cancelled because of the coronavirus outbreak. Look back next year for similar events!

Celebrating 25 years of the Heritage Gardens!

The annual celebration, hosted by the Johnson County Master Gardeners, is a tribute to Iowa’s history and food.

Built in 1844, Plum Grove was the home of Robert and Friendly Lucas. Robert served as the first governor of the Territory of Iowa from 1838 until 1841. Iowa was admitted to the Union as a state December 3, 1846.

After years of negotiating with the Johnson County Historical Society that cares for the property, longtime Master Gardener Betty Kelly launched the garden in 1995 as the state planned Iowa’s Sesquicentennial. “The garden was another opportunity to inform the public about the state’s history, agriculture and its citizens.”

Through the years, Plum Grove heirloom gardens have received local, state and national recognition including the first Iowa State Service Award, National Smithsonian Garden Award and an Irving Weber Award. Twice Plum Grove has been a featured garden on the Project GREEN Garden Tour.

Each year, the food for the Taste is prepared and served by Johnson County Master Gardeners.

This event is open to the public. $5 suggested donation.

 

Lucas Farms History Day (JCHS Activities)

Notice: Activities have switched from the 27th!
The Lucas Farms History Day is a festival just south of downtown Iowa City. Easily accessible, the festival includes free food, games, and much more!

This event is part of a summer series highlighting the Meskwaki Nation and their history in Eastern Iowa. As a part of the Lucas Farms Neighborhood, the JCHS is happy to welcome the John Hauberg Indian Museum to Plum Grove. The Hauberg will provide activities for people of all ages and is a good source of information about the historical lives of Native people in Iowa.

Project GREEN will be at Plum Grove the 27th and 28th. They will give tours of local gardens in the beautiful Lucas Farms Neighborhood area! Project GREEN is a citizen-volunteer nonprofit organization that “invests in public landscaping projects and promotes environmental awareness in the greater Iowa City area.” —ProjectGREEN.org

Using Archaeology to Follow Meskwaki Leaders across Pre-Statehood Iowa

Cindy Peterson shares the stories and artifacts that uncover the history of Meskwaki migrations in the early 1800s. She’ll use her 20+ years of research and first-hand experience in the field of archaeology to bring to life the culture, ideas, and implications of the Meskwaki’s migrations westward—moves that were sometimes chosen for themselves and other times imposed by the U.S. government under the pretense of political treaties.

The University of Iowa’s Office of the State Archaeologist (OSA) investigated several sites related to two important 1830s-1840s Meskwaki leaders: Chief Poweshiek and Chief Wacoshashe. Their villages moved from the Mississippi River to Rochester, Iowa City, the Coralville Reservoir, South Amana, the Skunk River, southwest Iowa, (possibly) Kansas, and finally, Tama County. While much remains to be discovered, a glimpse into village movements and layouts has been discerned through OSA’s archaeological work at trading posts, villages, winter camps, and a maple sugaring camp.

This event is free and open to the public.

Meskwaki woman at her winter dwelling. Photo courtesy State Historical Society of Iowa.


Cindy works at The Office of the State Archaeologist as their Research Director. Her research interests include:

Midcontinental Late Prehistoric traditions, archaeology and ethnographies of Iowa’s historic tribes, archeology of European immigrant groups to the Midcontinent, industrial archaeology, public participation in archaeology.

Office of the State Archaeologist

 

POSTPONED: Plum Grove Season Opening Celebration

UPDATE: This event has been postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak. More information will follow when possible.

This event is the perfect opportunity for families to get out of the house over the long Memorial Day weekend. Kids can burn off some energy making crafts and running around the beautiful yards of Plum Grove; adults can savor the relaxing atmosphere and participate in activities that are designed with them in mind (visit this page periodically to stay updated about the activities and special guests that will be featured at this event).

POSTPONED: Atlases, Maps, and More: The Melchoir Huebinger Lecture

UPDATE: This event has been postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak. This event has been rescheduled for the 11th of October.

This lecture, presented by Mike Flaherty, will provide a wealth of information about Melchoir Huebinger and his creation of the first Iowa road atlas. Melchoir Huebinger worked as a cartographer in the later part of the 1800s and the early 1900s. His work helped convince the nation that Iowa had “stepped out of the mud” and had new, modern paved roads. Huebinger and his company, the Iowa Publishing Co., were features at the Chicago and St. Louis World Fairs.

Mike will show off part of his collection of rare maps and atlases during this event.

This event is free and open to the public.


Melchior Huebinger

Melchior Huebinger’s employees hard at work!

Aisle of Lights (JCHS Activities)

The Coralville Aisle of Lights is an annual winter event perfectly suited to the dreary weather. The brightly lit luminarias around the city give a warmth and friendliness in the cold. The JCHS will have crafts, baked goods, and hot cider for you and your family!

This event is free and open to the public.

The JCHS partners with the Antique Car Museum of Iowa to provide a reduced admission price for both museums on this special day.

2019 Cemetery Walk

Come experience history in a new way at the most mysterious time of year. Meet some of Johnson County’s earliest residents at their final resting place. Emerging from the night in period costumes, they will tell tales of those buried in the East Union Mennonite Cemetery. Tours are every half hour; the last tour starts at 7:30.

This event is free and open to the public. Donations are welcome.

Photo by Bill Miller

Unfortunately, Laurie Taylor will no longer be providing headstone symbolism tours this year. We’ll miss you, Laurie!

Parking and restrooms will be available at the East Union Mennonite Church. Treats and apple cider will be available too!

It’s recommended you bring a flashlight to this event.

If there are any more people out there who are interested in being a tour guide, please email programs@johnsoncountyhistory.org or call (319) 351-5738. The responsibilities of a tour guide are very simple. Guide a group of people to the next spirit? Easy!

Creating the Black Utopia of Buxton, Iowa Book Signing and Lecture

Author Rachelle Chase (visit her website here) returns to the JCHS with her second book on Buxton: Creating the Black Utopia of Buxton, Iowa. Buxton, IA was a place of racial inclusion in a time when our country was anything but.

Come to the JCHS’s Community Room this September to hear Rachelle Chase discuss her research into this one-of-a-kind town.

This event is free and open to the public.

 

 

 

 

 

“Extensively researched and pleasantly written, Chase covers all facets of daily life. Rare photographs augment her coverage of this unique Hawkeye State place.”
–H. Roger Grant, professor of history, Clemson University

 

Available now at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Arcadia Publishing and more!

Heirloom Tomato Taste at Plum Grove

Tomatoes will be plentiful this August at Plum Grove. If you want a taste of sun-ripened tomatoes (and some of the goodies made from them) come on over and grab a bite.

1 2 3